Kelley Business School Workshop pic

Charles Schwab Donates to Kelley Business School Workshop

Kelley Business School Workshop pic

Kelley Business School Workshop
Image: news.indiana.edu

Felix Rippy is a JD/MBA and Indiana University graduate student in Public Affairs at the IUPUI SPEA school. After obtaining his JD, Felix Rippy obtained his MBA from Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.

In November 2016 it was announced that the Kelley School of Business would receive funding from Charles Schwab for a wealth management workshop that will allow students to earn 21 credits. Students will have the chance to meet with those in the industry, and practice their skills on real issues in the industry.

Because the wealth management industry is dominated by men, Schwab has requested that female speakers be part of the program. The company’s hope is that it will encourage female students to consider a career in financial planning, and allow Schwab to recruit students from the Kelley School’s graduates. The course will be ready by fall 2017, and will prepare students to sit for the Certified Financial Planner exam. Felix Rippy subsequently (in 2016) took and passed his Indiana State Life and Health as well as Property and Casualty exams and obtained those licenses, so that Felix Rippy is authorized to sell these types of financial products and offer advice about them.

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Long-Distance Running pic

Long-Distance Running Shown to Improve Memory

 

Long-Distance Running pic

Long-Distance Running
Image: mensfitness.com

Felix Rippy, an Indiana-based JD/MBA and MPA student at IUPUI SPEA school, was a founder of the Rippy Law Firm. Besides managing partners, his company dealt with more family case filings than any other firm in the Williamson County, Texas area. Outside his work, Felix Rippy enjoys distance running for exercise and as a hobby.

Researchers have found that long-distance running, involving steady patterns of more than several miles, can improve memory. After running, a protein is released into the brain that is related to improved memory. Runners were shown to have a 16 percent increase in memory. Long-distance running has also been shown to fight mental decline due to aging.

Research has shown that those who have suffered from a stroke are able to improve their abilities in using judgement, recalling from memory, and language skills up to 50 percent by staying fit and exercising. Through running and other forms of exercise, individuals can keep their minds active enough to have a good working memory. They find they can also change tasks easier. So, perhaps it is no coincidence that Felix Rippy also has run more competitive 5k road races than anyone living within 100 miles of Indianapolis, Indiana per the Athlinks.com website.

Kiwanis Works to Eliminate Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus

Kiwanis Clubs

Kiwanis Clubs

 

Felix Rippy, an MPA certificate candidate and PhD applicant at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs, is a founding partner of the Rippy Law Firm in Williamson County, Texas. Outside of his work with the firm, Felix Rippy is involved in a number of charitable organizations, and he served as president of his local Kiwanis Club (the Round Rock Morning Sunrisers Kiwanis Club) for five terms totaling 10 years. As part of a class project at IUPUI Felix Rippy recently met with Christina Hale, regarding health issues facing policy makers. Christina Hale was until November, 2016 running for Indiana Lieutenant Governor, and she formerly worked for Kiwanis International based out of Indianapolis. Felix Rippy’s area of interest for the Morning Sunrisers Club in Round Rock, Texas, where he was President for a decade, was in preserving outdoors interests in children and sponsoring a “Kids’ Fish” annually.

Kiwanis Clubs are local branches of Kiwanis International, an organization that focuses on local issues and solutions, especially concerning children. These clubs are located in over 80 different nations worldwide.

Kiwanis serves local communities through initiatives including the Eliminate Project. The project changes according to needs as the years pass, but is currently focused on raising funds to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus, a disease that is common and often fatal. To accomplish this goal, Kiwanis partners with UNICEF to raise funds for and distribute the needed medicine to underserved areas across the globe.

In recent years, the Eliminate Project has worked successfully to combat a multitude of issues, such as iodine deficiency disorder. To learn how you can assist with the project, visit www.kiwanis.org.